Wednesday, July 22, 2015

curing onions and garlic


Hello from the farm, 

This week we were afield wondering to ourselves "why build a sauna when we can just be working outside in Lancaster County?"
We welcomed the cooler drier air with smiles and renewed energy. Since last week's harvest we have been pulling and curing storage onions, digging and curing garlic, tweaking the root crop digger with a few modifications to handle weeds better, drinking lots of water, and starting to look towards fall with getting fields ready for fall crops and cover crops.

Cover crops like rye, buckwheat, clover and oats are used to suppress weed growth, add organic matter, and even add atmospheric nitrogen to the soil via the vascular system of plants that store it up on root nodules. To put it simply "free fertilizer." :-)

The heat is encouraging the tomatoes and peppers, and the cantaloupes should be ready in about two weeks, and then maybe 3-4 until the watermelon are ripe.

 It's bean a really good harvest :-)  These fresh beans are amazing! 

Abendessen Bread: 

 Law Reh and Brian (trying to not be in the picture) :-) head out for another load of onions to cure in the greenhouse. 



Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Green/Purple/Yellow Beans: these beans are so amazingly good it almost puts frozen beans to shame.  The purple variety is beautiful--if heated they turn green, if used in salad their purple looks great.  To cook, bring to a boil in an inch of water or so, then turn down to three lines or so until tender. Yum yum! 

Garlic: woohoo for our farm's garlic, so fresh and tasty. It goes really well in the tomato cucumber salad I talked about last week. 

Sweet Onions: these are mild and sweet and so good in salads or caramelized in the frying pan with butter. 

Eggplant: The Italian and Asian types differ only in shape and color, they are used in the same manner.  I like them sliced and grillled or pan fried with soy sauce, oil, miso etc until browned and crispy.  

Cucumbers: We are probably biased, but our cucumbers are delicious!
Some Russian friends served me this type of cucumber salad years back, and it's been my favorite salad since:

Chop cucumbers, tomatoes, onions and mince garlic cloves or scapes, mix and douse with olive oil, add salt and pepper to taste.  The flavors blend and it tastes even better if it sits for half and hour or so before eating it, but you can eat it immediately too.



Zucchini: use for zucchini bread, puree for soup stock, or slice and fry with oil and seasonings, or dice for salads.
Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Beets:  We have some golden and striped beets coming in this week., beautiful.  mmm, I used to love to eat these after my mother had blanched them and slipped the skins off and they were cooling on the counter.  Super nutritious, they can be roasted, grated for salad, boiled or steamed, then eaten hot or cold, and of course, made into pickled beets or used for pickled beet eggs.  Makes me hungry writing about them.  
Kale/Collards/Senposai: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.

Chard: this cousin to the beet is appreciated for its leaves instead of its roots.  Use for salads, or as a spinach or kale substitute in cooking.  




Goodbyes: 

Cabbage: great for a cabbage and chopped peanut with vinegar salad. Simple and surprisingly good in spite of its simplicity. 
Garlic scapes:  these are the would-be flowering stems of garlic--soft, tender, easy to use for stir fries, diced for salad, really anywhere a mild garlic flavor is desired. We like to use it for pesto here at the farm. 
Napa cabbage: this Asian cabbage is main ingredient in Kimchee, a spicy kraut or relish of sort. The quality is great diminished so we are not harvesting it any more until the new fall crop. 
Bok Choi: the joy of choi, this is great for stir fries and goes well with peanuts, cashews, ginger, soy sauce, garlic, peanut butter, chicken.   This will return in fall. 
Lettuce heads: the lettuce did really well, we hope you enjoyed it.
 Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Rhubarb: rhubarb is harvested only in Spring and is then given a year's rest 
Parsnip: may have a late fall crop of these. 



 The Pick Your Own Field: 

Each year we plant the pick your own field with lots of favorites like sunflowers, zinnias, Sungold cherry tomatoes, and basil, while also adding in some experimental and novelty things like rice, amaranth, quinoa, insanely hot peppers (and milder ones). 
General rules of thumb:

If plentiful, take a little more, if scarce, go easy on the crop
For herbs--pinch only the tops of stems so that they can regrow




This week at the Farm, 7/25: Loosen up with a yoga sampler before you gather this week's harvest ! Certified instructor Karen Simpson will lead three sessions, 20 minutes each, starting at 9:15 am, with a break between sessions. BYO mat or beach towel & water. Sessions will include Restorative & Family yoga, as suits our audience. No registration needed; suggested donation $5.

We hope you are enjoying the summer harvest!  

Your farmers

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Garlic harvest, the deluge continues


Hello from the farm, 

Well, soggy acres continue here the farm, with two torrential downpours landing squarely on 150 Letort Rd in the last week. The first was Thursday evening and the next one was Tuesday evening with reports of 2 1/2 inches falling quickly in Millersville. 

The hot crops, tomatoes, peppers and eggplants are picking up speed, albeit slowly.  The many cloudy and relatively cool days have a way of hindering photosynthesis and growth, so our tomatoes and peppers are progressing much more slowly than in a typical season.  We're not worried, once they are up to speed, they'll produce their usual bounty.  

This week we were pleased to get the rest of the butternut squash planted on Monday before the rains came again and we also dove into the garlic harvest and starting harvesting sweet onions as well.  We had a close call with Gumby having too much to drink one night (when it stormed) but fortunately his electric motor was not ruined and he is back up and running. 


The garlic is curing nicely in the barn and the first batch is ready for this week! 

Abendessen Bread: This week Stephanie is baking French Bread for $5 a loaf

Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Garlic: woohoo for our farm's garlic, so fresh and tasty. It goes really well in the tomato cucumber salad I talked about last week. 
Sweet Onions: these are mild and sweet and so good in salads or caramelized in the frying pan with butter. 



Eggplant:
 The Italian and Asian types differ only in shape and color, they are used in the same manner.  I like them sliced and grillled or pan fried with soy sauce, oil, miso etc until browned and crispy.  

New Potatoes: postponed another week due to muddy fields. wow, new potatoes are delicious boiled or steamed until tender and then topped with a little bit of salt and butter


Cucumbers: We are probably biased, but our cucumbers are delicious!
Some Russian friends served me this type of cucumber salad years back, and it's been my favorite salad since:

Chop cucumbers, tomatoes, onions and mince garlic cloves or scapes, mix and douse with olive oil, add salt and pepper to taste.  The flavors blend and it tastes even better if it sits for half and hour or so before eating it, but you can eat it immediately too.



Zucchini: use for zucchini bread, puree for soup stock, or slice and fry with oil and seasonings, or dice for salads.
Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Beets: mmm, I used to love to eat these after my mother had blanched them and slipped the skins off and they were cooling on the counter.  Super nutritious, they can be roasted, grated for salad, boiled or steamed, then eaten hot or cold, and of course, made into pickled beets or used for pickled beet eggs.  Makes me hungry writing about them.  
Kale/Collards/Senposai: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.

Chard: this cousin to the beet is appreciated for its leaves instead of its roots.  Use for salads, or as a spinach or kale substitute in cooking.  

Cabbage: great for a cabbage and chopped peanut with vinegar salad. Simple and surprisingly good in spite of its simplicity. 


Goodbyes: 
Garlic scapes:  these are the would-be flowering stems of garlic--soft, tender, easy to use for stir fries, diced for salad, really anywhere a mild garlic flavor is desired. We like to use it for pesto here at the farm. 
Napa cabbage: this Asian cabbage is main ingredient in Kimchee, a spicy kraut or relish of sort. The quality is great diminished so we are not harvesting it any more until the new fall crop. 
Bok Choi: the joy of choi, this is great for stir fries and goes well with peanuts, cashews, ginger, soy sauce, garlic, peanut butter, chicken.   This will return in fall. 
Lettuce heads: the lettuce did really well, we hope you enjoyed it.
 Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Rhubarb: rhubarb is harvested only in Spring and is then given a year's rest 
Parsnip: may have a late fall crop of these. 



 The Pick Your Own Field is Coming Alive: 

Each year we plant the pick your own field with lots of favorites like sunflowers, zinnias, Sungold cherry tomatoes, and basil, while also adding in some experimental and novelty things like rice, amaranth, quinoa, insanely hot peppers (and milder ones). 
General rules of thumb:

If plentiful, take a little more, if scarce, go easy on the crop
For herbs--pinch only the tops of stems so that they can regrow


This Saturday--Join cookbook author and food blogger Marisa McClellan for a canning class at Homefields. Saturday, July 18, 10:30-12:30. We'll make a batch of Nectarine Lime Jam, dig into the mechanics of boiling water bath canning, & talk about how to make the safest & most delicious home preserves possible. Marisa will demystify canning for the beginners & will offer useful tips & short cuts for seasoned preserves. All participants will go home with a small jar of the jam made in class, as well as the knowledge to go home & make more! Class size is limited, so register with a friend for a great morning; to register, please send your name & phone number to Heather@Homefields.org; the fee is $22 per person, check payable to Homefields or with a credit card here: https://www.homefields.org/

next week at the Farm, 7/25: Loosen up with a yoga sampler before you gather this week's harvest ! Certified instructor Karen Simpson will lead three sessions, 20 minutes each, starting at 9:15 am, with a break between sessions. BYO mat or beach towel & water. Sessions will include Restorative & Family yoga, as suits our audience. No registration needed; suggested donation $5.

Enjoy the harvest, 

Your farmers

Thursday, July 9, 2015

Window of Opportunity, garlic harvest

Hello from the farm, 

The great news this week is that despite the continuing rains, it dried out just enough to get some much overdue transplanting done.  There is about a two week gap between the first strawberry plants we put in and the remaining half that we got in on Tuesday.  Yesterday we pushed determinedly to get a field disked, rototilled and planted with pumpkins and winter squash all by the end of the day. We didn't get them all transplanted in spite of intense and valiant efforts, but we planted about three-fourths of them and were happy with that. We had to conclude that good enough is perfect and call it a day. 

 
transplanting always evokes smiles from your farmers! 


The garlic harvest is starting, and it looks to be a splendid crop! (despite the dark picture, sorry) After it is harvested and cleaned, it is cured for a few weeks in the barn to dry it down.  You'll see it possibly next week or the following. 

Abendessen Bread this week:  Sun-dried Tomato Bagels at $4 for a half dozen.  

Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Eggplant: The Italian and Asian types differ only in shape and color, they are used in the same manner.  I like them sliced and grillled or pan fried with soy sauce, oil, miso etc until browned and crispy.  

New Potatoes: postponed until next week due to mud. wow, new potatoes are delicious boiled or steamed until tender and then topped with a little bit of salt and butter


Cucumbers: We are probably biased, but our cucumbers are delicious!
Some Russian friends served me this type of cucumber salad years back, and it's been my favorite salad since:

Chop cucumbers, tomatoes, onions and mince garlic cloves or scapes, mix and douse with olive oil, add salt and pepper to taste.  The flavors blend and it tastes even better if it sits for half and hour or so before eating it, but you can eat it immediately too.



Zucchini: use for zucchini bread, puree for soup stock, or slice and fry with oil and seasonings, or dice for salads.
Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Beets: (taking a week or two off to size up) mmm, I used to love to eat these after my mother had blanched them and slipped the skins off and they were cooling on the counter.  Super nutritious, they can be roasted, grated for salad, boiled or steamed, then eaten hot or cold, and of course, made into pickled beets or used for pickled beet eggs.  Makes me hungry writing about them.  
Kale/Collards/Senposai: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.
Garlic scapes:  these are the would-be flowering stems of garlic--soft, tender, easy to use for stir fries, diced for salad, really anywhere a mild garlic flavor is desired. We like to use it for pesto here at the farm.
Chard: this cousin to the beet is appreciated for its leaves instead of its roots.  Use for salads, or as a spinach or kale substitute in cooking.  

Cabbage: great for a cabbage and chopped peanut with vinegar salad. Simple and surprisingly good in spite of its simplicity. 


Goodbyes: 

Napa cabbage: this Asian cabbage is main ingredient in Kimchee, a spicy kraut or relish of sort. The quality is great diminished so we are not harvesting it any more until the new fall crop. 
Bok Choi: the joy of choi, this is great for stir fries and goes well with peanuts, cashews, ginger, soy sauce, garlic, peanut butter, chicken.   This will return in fall. 
Lettuce heads: the lettuce did really well, we hope you enjoyed it.
 Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Rhubarb: rhubarb is harvested only in Spring and is then given a year's rest 
Parsnip: may have a late fall crop of these. 


 The Pick Your Own Field is Coming Alive: 

Each year we plant the pick your own field with lots of favorites like sunflowers, zinnias, Sungold cherry tomatoes, and basil, while also adding in some experimental and novelty things like rice, amaranth, quinoa, insanely hot peppers (and milder ones). 
General rules of thumb:

If plentiful, take a little more, if scarce, go easy on the crop
For herbs--pinch only the tops of stems so that they can regrow


BIG NEWS from Homefields--Join cookbook author and food blogger Marisa McClellan for a canning class at Homefields. Saturday, July 18, 10:30-12:30. We'll make a batch of Nectarine Lime Jam, dig into the mechanics of boiling water bath canning, & talk about how to make the safest & most delicious home preserves possible. Marisa will demystify canning for the beginners & will offer useful tips & short cuts for seasoned preserves. All participants will go home with a small jar of the jam made in class, as well as the knowledge to go home & make more! Class size is limited, so register with a friend for a great morning; to register, please send your name & phone number to Heather@Homefields.org; the fee is $22 per person, check payable to Homefields or with a credit card here: https://www.homefields.org/

Enjoy the harvest, 

Your farmers

Thursday, July 2, 2015

The Enduring Deluge, waiting for the fields to dry out

Hello from the farm, 

 The daily deluge continues to make farming and field work colorful, soggy and saturated. We have pumpkin and butternut transplants and fall crop seeds queued up to go into the fields, but we have to wait until the field is not pudding or we'll sink up to our axles--or knees.
 
the view from the field--this is the sunflower and okra planting

As July begins, the harvest will start to change substantially as the spring crops like broccoli, lettuce and some of the greens disappear. They will be replaced by the hot season crops like cucumbers, summer squash (zucchini), sweet peppers, eggplants, tomatoes, and last but not least, cantaloupes and watermelons in late July early August.  

 Sweet potato plants sitting in the drink

Abendessen Bread this week: Tomato Basil Sourdough this week for $5.00 a loaf.  

 Pick Your Own Options: (included at no extra charge with a farm share) 

Blueberries:  A big thanks to Farmer Gumby and the electronic squawker for keeping the birds out of the berry patch.  The season limit is 1 pint berry box for half shares, 2 pints for full shares. (we will increase the limit if the harvest permits) This means for 2015 half shares pick a total of 1 pint and Full shares pick a total of 2 pints.  
Please tell us when dark blue berries are no longer plentiful-and we will close the patch to allow more berries to ripen for the following week.  We want for everyone to be able to pick abundant and ripe berries--they are amazingly good!

Snow peas: these flat-podded peas are eaten "hull and all" except for the stem and string. They are wonderful lightly steamed, boiled or in stir fry, even good raw.
Snow peas are winding down, feel free to glean what remains. 



Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

New Potatoes: wow, new potatoes are delicious boiled or steamed until tender and then topped with a little bit of salt and butter


Cucumbers and Zucchini: these are starting to pick up steam, you may seem some of them this week. It is always a challenge for us to predict what amounts we are going to find in the field when things are just starting.

Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Beets: (taking a week or two off to size up) mmm, I used to love to eat these after my mother had blanched them and slipped the skins off and they were cooling on the counter.  Super nutritious, they can be roasted, grated for salad, boiled or steamed, then eaten hot or cold, and of course, made into pickled beets or used for pickled beet eggs.  Makes me hungry writing about them.  
Kale/Collards: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.
Garlic scapes:  these are the would-be flowering stems of garlic--soft, tender, easy to use for stir fries, diced for salad, really anywhere a mild garlic flavor is desired. We like to use it for pesto here at the farm.
Chard: this cousin to the beet is appreciated for its leaves instead of its roots.  Use for salads, or as a spinach or kale substitute in cooking.  
Napa cabbage: this Asian cabbage is main ingredient in Kimchee, a spicy kraut or relish of sort.  
Cabbage: great for a cabbage and chopped peanut with vinegar salad. Simple and surprisingly good in spite of its simplicity. 


Goodbyes: 
 Bok Choi: the joy of choi, this is great for stir fries and goes well with peanuts, cashews, ginger, soy sauce, garlic, peanut butter, chicken.   This will return in fall. 
Lettuce heads: the lettuce did really well, we hope you enjoyed it.
 
Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Rhubarb: rhubarb is harvested only in Spring and is then given a year's rest 
Parsnip: may have a late fall crop of these. 


 The Pick Your Own Field is Coming Alive: 

Each year we plant the pick your own field with lots of favorites like sunflowers, zinnias, Sungold cherry tomatoes, and basil, while also adding in some experimental and novelty things like rice, amaranth, quinoa, insanely hot peppers (and milder ones). 
General rules of thumb:

If plentiful, take a little more, if scarce, go easy on the crop
For herbs--pinch only the tops of stems so that they can regrow


BIG NEWS from Homefields--Join cookbook author and food blogger Marisa McClellan for a canning class at Homefields. Saturday, July 18, 10:30-12:30. We'll make a batch of Nectarine Lime Jam, dig into the mechanics of boiling water bath canning, & talk about how to make the safest & most delicious home preserves possible. Marisa will demystify canning for the beginners & will offer useful tips & short cuts for seasoned preserves. All participants will go home with a small jar of the jam made in class, as well as the knowledge to go home & make more! Class size is limited, so register with a friend for a great morning; to register, please send your name & phone number to Heather@Homefields.org; the fee is $22 per person, check payable to Homefields or with a credit card here: https://www.homefields.org/

Have a Happy July 4th and here's hoping for good weather to with your cook outs and veggies!

Your farmers

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Garlic scapes, pawpaws, organic methods and weed control



Hello from your farm, 

It's a great year for lettuce, and we're pretty pleased about that.  How did you enjoy your first week of the harvest?  Fresh and seasonal eating is a great adventure, tastes so good, and you feel alive eating this food.  If this is your first season, we'd be glad for an email giving us some feedback on your experience so far.

This week, like the last several weeks, we've been dodging the rain and working around the muddy conditions as best we can.  The sweet potato transplants are taking hold, the onion patch was weeded and looks wonderful, and our rotoweeder cleaned up the beans, sunflowers and okra. The pick your field will be ready in a few weeks--the flowers and herbs look happy.
I spent a good bit of time fighting with hydraulic hoses and fittings this week, could not resolve the problem to my satisfaction, but was able get a good bit of thistle disked before the rains came again.  
These are "farming full speed ahead" months, and for us,  the days go by like minutes.  We're navigating all sorts of weather--farming is a funny predicament, as you simultaneously wish for rain for about half of your crops and no rain for most of the work that you want to do at any given time :-) 

Hold on to your hats, the harvest is coming through! 

How do you Farm Organically? 

Everyone wants to know how we farm organically and how we manage the weeds--it is a question which could receive a very lengthy answer. However, I'll try to keep it concise.   Organic farming is something old come around again--our grandparents generation and earlier were accustomed to growing without chemicals. Chemical farming had its rise when munitions and chemicals left from WWII were discovered to be fast and efficient weed and pest killers, and people were hooked with the ease of spraying acres of crops instead of doing manual labor.  After all, if it is fast and easy, it must be good, right?  The unintended consequences began to reveal themselves over subsequent years: cancers, birth defects, amphibian and bird decline and more.

Biological/sustainable/organic farming, whatever name you know it by, has its foundation in healthy soil. If the soil is well-mineralized and healthy then the plants will be healthy. If the plants are healthy, they will not succumb to diseases in most cases. Healthy soil even has fewer weeds, as weeds are usually trying to balance something that is out of whack in the soil. So we make the soil healthy by taking soil samples and adding minerals to balance the soil, we also apply compost and like a modern-day Squanto, we use fish emulsion and seaweed to feed our soil microbes and crops.
 Did you notice that our food keeps very well and tastes better than the vegetables in the store? It's because of the super soil we are growing in. Now weeds, they can be the real Achilles heel of organic growing because we don't use herbicides. To deal with weeds we use crop rotation, soil balancing, flame weeding, tractor-drawn cultivating and yes of course, hoeing, mowing and hand-pulling, which are sometimes the bane of our existence! All in all, we hope you'll agree that our food is worth our careful and sometimes Hurculean efforts. 

 
Don't let anyone's farm glamour photos fool you, everyone has a weed challenge somewhere on their farm!  (see if you can spot our carrots)  


Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:
Lettuce heads: wow, these are beautiful this year. Enjoy as salad, sandwiches, wraps, or farm crew style, just plain munching on! 
Beets: mmm, I used to love to eat these after my mother had blanched them and slipped the skins off and they were cooling on the counter.  Super nutritious, they can be roasted, grated for salad, boiled or steamed, then eaten hot or cold, and of course, made into pickled beets or used for pickled beet eggs.  Makes me hungry writing about them.  
Kale/Collards: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.
Garlic scapes:  these are the would-be flowering stems of garlic--soft, tender, easy to use for stir fries, diced for salad, really anywhere a mild garlic flavor is desired. We like to use it for pesto here at the farm. *see garlic scape pesto recipe below*
Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Chard: this cousin to the beet is appreciated for its leaves instead of its roots.  Use for salads, or as a spinach or kale substitute in cooking.  
 Napa cabbage: this Asian cabbage is main ingredient in Kimchee, a spicy kraut or relish of sort.  


Pick Your Own Options: (included at no extra charge with a farm share) 

Snow peas: these flat-podded peas are eaten "hull and all" except for the stem and string. They are wonderful lightly steamed, boiled or in stir fry, even good raw.
Unlimited Picking Begins this week. 
Strawberries:  these are fading away quickly, picking is ONLY if you haven't picked yetSeason Limit is Half shares 1 quart Full shares 2 quarts 

Goodbyes: 
Rhubarb: our young plants have given us a good harvest for this year, and we will let them rest until next year when they will be more established.

Parsnip: we won't see these again until maybe late fall


Check out our baby pawpaw fruits. North America's largest native fruit ripens in September and is sort of like vanilla-banana-avocado custard.  


Garlic Scape Pesto: 1 c. grated Parmesan cheese
3 T. fresh lemon or lime juice
1/4lb fresh garlic scapes
1/2 c. olive oil
Salt to taste

Puree scapes and olive oil in blender until smooth. Stir in Parmesan and lemon or lime juice and season to taste. Serve on bread or crackers. --courtesy of Mary Jane's Farm

 We do have a few more shares available for this season. Email or call if you would like to hop on for the food and farm adventure this season. 

Enjoy the fresh harvest, 
Your farmers 

Monday, March 23, 2015

Getting ready for the new Season! Fruit shares and cheese shares too



Hello from the farm,

Chances are, you've had enough of the cold, ice and snow. Ready for warm weather and fresh food from the farm? We sure are.  Despite the snow and cold, we are preparing for the summer harvest even now--gathering supplies and seeds and getting ready to start planting in the greenhouse. Turning the greenhouse heat on in early March is a season highlight. It won't be long until it looks like this: 

 


 
And then the lettuce patch will follow and look like this! 

Now is the time to sign up for a share while you are thinking about it.  We often sell out of shares and we want to make sure returning shareholders are able get a share before we fill up.

The farm vegetable share signup is at: http://goodwillathomefieldsfarm.csasignup.com/members/types
If you want to read more about the farm program and the share first, check out http://www.yourgoodwill.org/grow/homefields-farm

Fruit and Cheese Shares from other Farms:

These shares from other farms will be available for you to subscribe to and pick up at our farm. Please see their web sites and contact information to sign up.  

Cheese share from Hillacres Pride
 
note from Mandy--We wanted you to know that we will be offering our cheese share through Goodwill at Homefields again this year.  You must be a veggie share holder there to get the cheese share. Our share will be very similar to last year, running 11 deliveries of 2 cheeses each, for a total of 22 cheeses.  We will donate 5% of the cheese share to the organization as well.
http://hillacrespride.com/?q=content/csa-shares to sign up. 
Thank you for supporting our farm in 2014 and we look forward to working with you in 2015.  As always, if you have any comments about our cheese or the share, we would love to hear from you.
Sincerely,
Mandy Arrowsmith
Hillacres Pride

North Star Orchard fruit share--note from Lisa. Would you like to pick up a CSA Fruit Share when you come to get your vegetables at the farm? It’s time to sign up NOW with North Star Orchard for their weekly Fruit Share, which is available for pickup for 15 weeks starting in August.

CSA Members here have been enjoying the Fruit Share for years, and we encourage you to take a look at what the share has to offer here: http://www.northstarorchard.com/csa_fruit.php

This is not ordinary fruit, but unique and heritage varieties which are full of flavor: plums with pizazz, perfect peaches, amazing Asian pears, and astounding apples. Plus a sprinkling of heritage pear varieties and hopefully this year, some table grapes!

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then this one consists, in part, of these:  sweet, tart, juicy, crunchy, crisp, aromatic, sugary-tart, rich, velvety, smile, slurp.

We're looking forward to a great harvest of all the vegetables and fruits that you've come to know and love here--Sungold cherry tomatoes, Carmen red peppers, Orangeglo and seedless watermelon, beautiful lettuce and tasty beans, and of course strawberries and blueberries!   Summer has never failed to arrive, and so we look forward to crisp, tasty vegetable harvests sooner than Old Man Winter would have us think! 

Scott for the farm crew

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Lancaster County Gift Boxes for your customers, clients, teachers, and family


Hello from the farm, 



 
 Farm elves in the office                  

 The garlic is happily planted, the irrigation is put away, the farmers are happy to be indoors this dreary day.  
It is gift box time here in the barn, as we listen to Christmas music and smell the aroma of freshly-roasted coffee, something no one complains about :-)
These boxes are great gifts for family, customers, clients and friends.  


The small gift box includes a packet of College Coffee Roaster’s custom blend, “Goodwill at Homefields Farm” coffee, an eight-ounce bag of tasty Wilbur Buds, one eight-ounce jar of Kitchen Kettle Apple Butter and a bag of Snyder's of Hanover Peanut Butter Pretzel Sandwiches.Price: $18.95

 

The large gift box features more Lancaster County flavors. It includes a 1/2 pound bag of “Goodwill at Homefields Farm” blend coffee from College Coffee Roasters, an eight-ounce bag of yummy Wilbur Chocolate Buds, one 8 ounce jar of Kitchen Kettle Apple Butter and one 8 ounce Bauman's Pear Butter, (a delicious Lancaster County treat that spreads easily on bread and crackers) and an 8oz bag of Snyder's of Hanover Peanut Butter Pretzel Sandwiches. Price $24.95

Order deadline is Dec 5th Place orders by emailing sbreneman@yourgoodwill.org or call us at 717-871-3110. Please Pick up Gift Boxes at the farm on Dec 16th and 17th between 8:30-4pm.

Thank you for supporting the farmers and the CSA program.

Your farmers