Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Where is Gumby, Potato Harvest and Garlic


Hello from the farm, 

It's another week full of twists and turns.  We started off the week Monday morning by finding out that Gumby has been stolen, disappearing sometime after 8pm Sunday night and Monday morning.  When the birds realized that Gumby was AWOL, brazen hordes of them swarmed in to feast on blueberries.  We were not happy campers.  The next day, Bob came in and rigged up a "Gumby knock--off" and we were keeping back the birds again.  We dug right into the garlic harvest and we are thrilled to have an excellent crop this year.   
We spent a good bit of time hand weeding in the sweet potatoes--it is absurd how quickly the red root and lambsquarter weeds can grow in just a week.  We continue to have an endless litany of difficulties with our farm van and are looking to replace it soon.  We also began the potato harvesting this week, looking good. :-) 

WHERE IS GUMBY?
FARMER GUMBY STOLEN - $50 Goodwill Gift Card Reward for his safe return.

Goodwill at Homefields Farm's Gumby was stolen sometime Sunday after 8pm. We need him back to keep the birds away from the berries!  
If you have information related to his whereabouts, please email concerns@yourgoodwill.org. We are offering a $50 Goodwill Gift Card for his safe return. Thank you. — at Goodwill at Homefields Farm.



Pick Your Own field Update:

Please wait to pick things in the herb beds and Pick Your Own field until you see it listed on the Pick Your Own/Herb boards, so things reach the correct height, stage or maturity.

If we've overlooked something, please let us know!! :-) 

Flowers:  see flower board at distribution area
**observe that CLEOMES have thorns**

Basil: cut only the top third of stems to allow for regrowth.  



Garlic drying upstairs in the barn. Once cured this way it can keep for a long time. 


It's tater time :-)  This week's Spotlighted potato is the Eva potato. Boil or steam in salted water until soft for that "new potato" experience. We ate some at lunch and enjoyed them very much.  


Stephanie the Breadbaker:

Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Garlic: it is so nice to have fresh garlic. For maximum health benefit, cut and let stand for about 10 minutes to oxidize and thereby form the beneficial compounds. Not just super tasty, garlic also is known for reducing blood pressure, heart disease and cholesterol.

Carrots: 
carrots are really good roasted in the oven with some coconut, olive or peanut oil. Of course they are also good as carrot sticks or in salads. 
Beets:  these are good roasted or grated raw in a salad. For more work :-) look up a borsht recipe online. 

Walla Walla Sweet Onions:Mmm, what could be better than carmelized Walla Walla sweet onions?  Take a heavy frying pan, put in a big pat of butter (the pendulum now has swung in butter's favor)  and a whole mess of sliced onions and fry medium low stirring every five minutes or so until golden brown. Wow.  Then, put on top of fried egg and cover with your favorite cheese and broil.  Perfection! 

Eggplants:  We really like the long slender Asian type eggplants! They are user friendly, mild and great for grilling with soy sauce, miso etc on the grill or use in any recipe that calls for eggplant--in short, treat them the same as the Italian "bell-type" eggplants.  

Kohlrabi
: sort of a mini-broccoli little crunchy dude, these are tasty raw and taste kind of like mild sweet broccoli. Usually eaten raw.  Some people peel away the outer layer.  I ate one this morning unpeeled and enjoyed it.  

Cucumbers!:  while most people don't usually drool over cucumbers, maybe they should over these. We don't like to boast, but these cucumbers are fabulous. Check out the Poona Kheera cucumber from India--they are golden brown when ripe, very crisp and juicy and never bitter. A real winner. 

Summer Squash:  add raw to salads, steam lightly, or stir-fry. Don't overcook unless you like soft consistency.

Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 

  
Goodbyes: 

Greens: these succumbed to the heat, with the exception of chard which continue to grow through the summer heat. We like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.

Broccoli: Broccoli is dicey as a spring crop and the heat has made it flower and diminished its quality--look for a new crop in fall. 

Garlic scapes: we hope you enjoyed the delightful flavor of these. In a couple of weeks the garlic bulbs will be ready! 

Lettuce heads: these have run their course and are stretching skyward--a precursor to bolting--flowering to make seed.

Lettuce mix--the leaves have given it their all and are now finished.  

Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 

Cilantro: this herb has run its life cycle and is "bolting" or going to seed.  



Enjoy the harvest! 

Your farmers 

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Notes from Your Farm: Dragon carrots, garlic harvest, overnight pickles


Hello from the farm, 

We wanted some rain, and sure enough, we got some, and then some more, but we'll not complain.  We're never bored at the farm, and as usual things are hopping.  We are harvesting carrots and garlic this week!  Carrots, if you've never grown them, are a hard-fought victory when you actually have them in hand

Carrots are difficult to germinate, take a long time to sprout, are poor weed competitors, are temperature sensitive, require extensive hoeing and hand-weeding, thinning and laborious harvesting and washing. So if all those things go well, we get carrots, and sure we enough that all happened! :-)
And...drum roll, it's garlic digging time too.  Garlic is our longest growing crop.  We plant it in October and it matures almost a year later in July.  We are pleased that our farm-made potato digger works for garlic as well.  This garlic is so good, a real culinary treat!  Enjoy. 


Cameron the Victor, shows off a Dragon carrot

 
Carrots of many colors.  Carrots were historically many colors--the orange color was popularized by Dutch vegetable growers. Carrots of other colors also contain many healthful anthocyanins. 

Pick Your Own field Update:


Please wait to pick things in the herb beds and Pick Your Own field until you see it listed on the Pick Your Own/Herb boards, so things reach the correct height, stage or maturity.

If we've overlooked something, please let us know!! :-) 
 
 
Basil: cut only the top third of stems to allow for regrowth.  



 
Stephanie the Breadbaker is making Hefezopf (a braided yeast bread) this week .  It's $6/loaf.


 
thanks to Elizabeth, Asst. Farmer for putting together a farm crew poster! 

Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Carrots: carrots are really good roasted in the oven with some coconut, olive or peanut oil. Of course they are also good as carrot sticks or in salads. 
Beets:  these are good roasted or grated raw in a salad. For more work :-) look up a borsht recipe online. 

Walla Walla Sweet Onions:
Mmm, what could be better than carmelized Walla Walla sweet onions?  Take a heavy frying pan, put in a big pat of butter (the pendulum now has swung in butter's favor)  and a whole mess of sliced onions and fry medium low stirring every five minutes or so until golden brown. Wow.  Then, put on top of fried egg and cover with your favorite cheese and broil.  Perfection! 
Eggplants:  We really like the long slender Asian type eggplants! They are user friendly, mild and great for grilling with soy sauce, miso etc on the grill or use in any recipe that calls for eggplant--in short, treat them the same as the Italian "bell-type" eggplants.  

Kohlrabi
: sort of a mini-broccoli little crunchy dude, these are tasty raw and taste kind of like mild sweet broccoli. Usually eaten raw.  Some people peel away the outer layer.  I ate one this morning unpeeled and enjoyed it.  

Cucumbers!:  while most people don't usually drool over cucumbers, maybe they should over these. We don't like to boast, but these cucumbers are fabulous. Check out the Poona Kheera cucumber from India--they are golden brown when ripe, very crisp and juicy and never bitter. A real winner.  See overnight pickle recipe below 

Summer Squash:  add raw to salads, steam lightly, or stir-fry. Don't overcook unless you like soft consistency.

Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 



Goodbyes: 

Beansfinished until second planting begins bearing. Frozen beans taste pretty good until you eat some of our beans and your perspective changes.  The purple ones are equally delicious--if you want to preserve the purple color, don't cook them--they turn green when heated.  The purple ones look awesome in a salad. 
Greens: these succumbed to the heat, with the exception of chard which continue to grow through the summer heat. We like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.
Broccoli: Broccoli is dicey as a spring crop and the heat has made it flower and diminished its quality--look for a new crop in fall. 
Garlic scapes: we hope you enjoyed the delightful flavor of these. In a couple of weeks the garlic bulbs will be ready! 
Lettuce heads: these have run their course and are stretching skyward--a precursor to bolting--flowering to make seed. 
Lettuce mix--the leaves have given it their all and are now finished.  
Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Cilantro: this herb has run its life cycle and is "bolting" or going to seed.  

Justine's Overnight Pickle Recipe 

2 qts water
1 1/4c white vinegar
1/4 c canning salt
1/4 c sugar
1 tsp pickling spice
Combine in a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Let cool.

While liquid is cooling, cut pickles-anyway you like- and put into a jar, large bowl...etc.
I also add fresh dill and few hole cloves of garlic.Pour the cooled liquid over the cucumbers and cover.
Put in the refrigerator for 24 hours...then enjoy!

Hope you like them!
thanks to shareholder Justine for this recipe 

Enjoy the harvest! 

Your farmers 

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Notes from Your Farm: Henry Ford and Harry Ferguson, amaranth

Hello from the farm, 

Not to sound like a farmer, but boy it is dry! We sure could use some rain.  We spent a lot of time drip irrigating in the last week, which "caused" it to rain a tenth the other night, but hot windy days around 90 degrees steal a lot of moisture.   

The farm crew is going great beans.  If you've ever picked beans you know it takes considerable effort and time to amass a sizeable quantity of them.  Now imagine picking about 240 pounds of beans. That is exactly what the farm crew did. Whew! and Wow! 

Henry Ford and Harry Ferguson visit the farm


We received a message from Dave in Holtwood this week who wanted to donate a tractor to the farm program.  This iconic 1939 Ford carries the manufacturing wisdom of Henry Ford who wished to make the tractor available and affordable for everyday folk,  and Harry Ferguson the Irish inventor who developed the modern 3 point hitch system.  His hitch system patent provided for attaching farm equipment safely and effectively to the back of a tractor.  
Prior to Ferguson's design, tractors would often flip over backwards if the disk or plow struck an immovable object.  Seventy-five years later, all tractors still employ Ferguson's design.  We are very grateful to you Dave, thank you.  Thank you very much to good friend Ed Kelly for hauling it here last night. 


 Pick Your Own field Update:
Every year we grow a host of standard items in the pick your own field that have done well and that we know people appreciate a lot.  We also put in some trial and experimental things to see how they do.  This year some of the more eclectic things include: amaranth, quinoa, and peanuts among others.  

Please wait to pick things in the herb beds and Pick Your Own field until you see it listed on the Pick Your Own/Herb boards, so things reach the correct height, stage or maturity.

If we've overlooked something, please let us know!! :-) 
 We've been debating this week whether to call the Pick Your Own field "Swope Field or Coble Field," both Elizabeth and Cameron have done a mighty lot to make it what it is.  
  
 Grain Amaranth, food of the Aztecs is high in lysine and free of gluten.

Basil: cut only the top third of stems to allow for regrowth.

 

Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Walla Walla Sweet Onions:
Mmm, what could be better than carmelized Walla Walla sweet onions?  Take a heavy frying pan, put in a big pat of butter (the pendulum now has swung in butter's favor)  and a whole mess of sliced onions and fry medium low stirring every five minutes or so until golden brown. Wow.  Then, put on top of fried egg and cover with your favorite cheese and broil.  Perfection! 
Eggplants:  We really like the long slender Asian type eggplants! They are user friendly, mild and great for grilling with soy sauce, miso etc on the grill or use in any recipe that calls for eggplant--in short, treat them the same as the Italian "bell-type" eggplants.  
Kohlrabi: sort of a mini-broccoli little crunchy dude, these are tasty raw and taste kind of like mild sweet broccoli. Usually eaten raw.  Some people peel away the outer layer.  I ate one this morning unpeeled and enjoyed it.  
 Green, Yellow and Purple Beans: Frozen beans taste pretty good until you eat some of our beans and your perspective changes.  The purple ones are equally delicious--if you want to preserve the purple color, don't cook them--they turn green when heated.  The purple ones look awesome in a salad. 

For cooking fresh beans--bring to a boil in a bit of water, then turn to low and cook until just tender. 

Cucumbers!:  while most people don't usually drool over cucumbers, maybe they should over these. We don't like to boast, but these cucumbers are fabulous. Check out the Poona Kheera cucumber from India--they are golden brown when ripe, very crisp and juicy and never bitter. A real winner.  See cool cucumber recipe below

Summer Squash:  add raw to salads, steam lightly, or stir-fry. Don't overcook unless you like soft consistency.

Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Greens: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.


Goodbyes: 
Broccoli: Broccoli is dicey as a spring crop and the heat has made it flower and diminished its quality--look for a new crop in fall. 
Kale: same situation as the broccoli, it is not faring well with the heat. 
Garlic scapes: we hope you enjoyed the delightful flavor of these. In a couple of weeks the garlic bulbs will be ready! 
Lettuce heads: these have run their course and are stretching skyward--a precursor to bolting--flowering to make seed. 
Lettuce mix--the leaves have given it their all and are now finished.  
Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Cilantro: this herb has run its life cycle and is "bolting" or going to seed.  

Farmer Kim’s Cucumber Raita

2 cups plain Greek yogurt
2 cups cubed, unpeeled cucumbers
1 clove garlic, diced
4 sprigs fresh mint, chopped
1 tsp sea salt
2 Tbsp golden raisins
Freshly ground black pepper

See you soon, 


Your farmers

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Notes from Your Farm: July 4th heat, beans arrive



A warm hello from the farm, 

It's July 4th week and we can safely say that it feels like it too! It's perfect weather for cold pasta cucumber salad--see recipe below.  This week we have been trickle irrigating the crops that grow under the plastic mulch film and also hoping for rain for the open field crops.  We finished transplanting the fall cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower yesterday and began putting the Long Island Cheese pumpkins in the ground as well.  The term fall crops can be confusing--they mature in fall, but they must be planted in summer to mature in time.  

The green, yellow and purple beans are ready and we're happy to be harvesting them once again.  
Tomatoes, peppers and eggplants are a few weeks off--sure signs of mid-summer and we eagerly await their arrival.  

 Baker Stephanie of Abendessen bread says: I will be baking Sun-dried Tomato Bagels for this week.  $4/half dozen $8/dozen


Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:
Green, Yellow and Purple Beans: Frozen beans taste pretty good until you eat some of our beans and your perspective changes.  The purple ones taste equally good--if you want to preserve the purple color, don't cook them--they turn green when heated.  The purple ones look awesome in a salad.

For cooking fresh beans--bring to a boil in a bit of water, then turn to low and cook until just tender. 

Cucumbers!:  while most people don't usually drool over cucumbers, maybe they should over these. We don't like to boast, but these cucumbers are fabulous. Check out the Poona Kheera cucumber from India--they are golden brown when ripe, very crisp and juicy and never bitter. A real winner. 

Summer Squash:  add raw to salads, steam lightly, or stir-fry. Don't overcook unless you like soft consistency.

Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Greens: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.


Goodbyes: 
Garlic scapes: we hope you enjoyed the delightful flavor of these. In a couple of weeks the garlic bulbs will be ready! 
Lettuce heads: these have run their course and are stretching skyward--a precursor to bolting--flowering to make seed. 
Lettuce mix--the leaves have given it their all and are now finished.  
Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Cilantro: this herb has run its life cycle and is "bolting" or going to seed.  

 

Cool cucumber noodle salad:  a cool meal after a hot day--we enjoyed this very much last evening! 
cook then rinse somen, soba or spaghetti noodles
dice and add cucumbers
dash of soy sauce to taste
dash of sesame oil to taste
cold diced cooked chicken or chopped peanuts for meatless.
dash of paprika or cayenne as desired
--from the kitchen of Lorena Breneman


Enjoy the harvest, 
 

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Hello from the farm, 

Ahhhh, the rain last evening is just what we were hoping for as the fields have gotten dry and the cabbage plants that we've been putting in for fall needed some water.  The farm crew has been doing an excellent job of weeding, hoeing and transplanting.  We've been running drip irrigation for the crops planted through mulch film--tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and onions, and they look super.  Successful growing is largely about timing, and things are happening at a good schedule.  Thank you farm crew! 

 Introducing Farm Gumby
 

 Of Birds and Blueberries: 
 Every year we have to have a new ace up our sleeve to keep the birds from totally demolishing the blueberry patch. Over the years we've employed foil balloons, metallic streamers, inflatable snakes, hawk-mimicking balloons, electronic distress calls and more. This year we welcome Farm Gumby to the blueberry patch.  He is an excellent ally so far at keeping the birds at bay. 

Pick Your Own Options: (included at no extra charge with a farm share) 

Snow peas: these flat-podded peas are eaten "hull and all" except for the stem and string. They are wonderful lightly steamed, boiled or in stir fry, even good raw.


Blueberries:  *Please Read* blueberries are just starting to ripen.  There will be some available for some shareholders this week, but definitely not for everyone.  They will ripen over a four week or longer season and we will have a season limit of 1 pint berry box for half shares, 2 pints for full shares. (we will increase the limit if the harvest permits as we think it will) 
Please tell us when dark blue berries are no longer plentiful-and we will close the patch to allow more berries to ripen.  We want for everyone to be able to pick abundant and ripe berries--they are amazingly good! 


How do you Farm Organically? 

(This was lost in formatting land last week so here it today :-)   A question we often hear from people, it is one which could receive a lengthy answer. However, for these weekly Notes, we'll keep it to a paragraph or so. Organic farming is something old come around again--our grandparents generation and earlier were accustomed to growing without chemicals. Chemical farming had its rise when munitions and chemicals left from WWII were discovered to be fast and efficient weed and pest killers, and people were hooked with the ease of spraying acres of crops instead of doing manual labor. 



Ok, now a second paragraph...biological/sustainable/organic farming, whatever name you know it by, has it foundation in healthy soil. If the soil is well-mineralized and healthy then the plants will be healthy. If the plants are healthy, they will not succumb to diseases usually. Healthy soil even has fewer weeds, as weeds are usually trying to balance something that is out of whack in the soil. So we make the soil healthy by taking soil samples and adding minerals to balance the soil, we also apply compost and like a modern-day Squanto, we use fish emulsion and seaweed to feed our soil microbes and crops.

Do you notice that our food keeps very well and tastes better than the vegetables in the store? It's because of the super soil we are growing in. Now weeds, they can be the real Achilles heel of organic growing because we don't use herbicides. To deal with weeds we use crop rotation, soil balancing, flame weeding, tractor-drawn cultivating and yes of course, hoeing, mowing and hand-pulling, which are sometimes the bane of our existence! All in all, we hope you'll agree that our food is worth our careful and sometimes Hurculean efforts. 


The tomato plants are growing by leaps and bounds. The red mulch film helps the tomatoes to ripen earlier and be more plentiful by providing the right reflected light.

Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Cucumbers!:  while most people don't usually drool over cucumbers, maybe they should over these. We don't like to boast, but these cucumbers are fabulous. Check out the Poona Kheera cucumber from India--they are golden brown when ripe, very crisp and juicy and never bitter. A real winner.

Summer Squash:  add raw to salads, steam lightly, or stir-fry. Don't overcook unless you like soft consistency.

Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Lettuce heads: wow, these are beautiful this year. Enjoy as salad, sandwiches, wraps, or farm crew style, just plain munching on! 
Lettuce mix--great with grated cheese, olive, vinegar, standard salad fixings
Kale/Collards: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.
Garlic scapes:  these are the would-be flowering stems of garlic--soft, tender, easy to use for stir fries, diced for salad, really anywhere a mild garlic flavor is desired. We like to use it for pesto here at the farm. *see garlic scape pesto recipe below*

Goodbyes: 
Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 
Cilantro: this herb has run its life cycle and is "bolting" or going to seed.  

Enjoy the harvest, 

Your farmers 

Thursday, June 19, 2014

How we farm organically, this week at the farm



Hello from your farm, 


It's a great year for lettuce, and we're pretty pleased about that!  How did you enjoy your first week of the harvest?  Fresh and seasonal eating is a great adventure, tastes great, and you simply feel alive eating this food.  
These are "farming full speed" months, and for us,  the days go by like minutes.  The crop outlook is a very good one--we've been spending a lot of time keeping the pesky weed, foxtail, out of the onions and potatoes, and we're going to have an outstanding crop of both as July rolls around.  We're weathering all sorts of weather--farming is a funny predicament, as you simultaneously wish for rain for about half of your crops and no rain for most of the work that you want to do at any given time :-) 


Hold on to your hats, the harvest is coming through! 

Serving Suggestions for the harvest this week:

Scallions: These mild-mannered onion family folks give an easy onion flavor to salads, sandwiches, stir fries and more.  Or you could do the old classic buttered bread and sliced scallion treat: my grandparents talked a lot about enjoying them in spring.  "A good spring tonic" says my 101 year old grandma. 
Lettuce heads: wow, these are beautiful this year. Enjoy as salad, sandwiches, wraps, or farm crew style, just plain munching on! 
Lettuce mix--great with grated cheese, olive, vinegar, standard salad fixings
Kale/Collards: we like to fry these in a skillet with butter or coconut oil until crisp, add some onions and saute them as well--a superb topping for rice, fried eggs or stand alone too.
Garlic scapes:  these are the would-be flowering stems of garlic--soft, tender, easy to use for stir fries, diced for salad, really anywhere a mild garlic flavor is desired. We like to use it for pesto here at the farm. *see garlic scape pesto recipe below*
Green garlic: this is garlic harvested before the base swells and becomes a bulb. It has a milder flavor than bulb garlic and can be used anywhere garlic is called for. Keep refrigerated as you would green onions/scallions. 

Pick Your Own Options: (included with your share--no additional fee--hooray) 

Snow peas: these flat-podded peas are eaten "hull and all" except for the stem and string. They are wonderful lightly steamed, boiled or in stir fry, even good raw.  The limit is reset due to abundance--1 and 2 quarts respectively may be picked this week. (in addition to what you may have picked last week) 
Strawberries:  This week we have bonus strawberries!--the limit is 1/2 quart box for half share and 1 quart box for full shares.  (in addition to what you may have picked last week) 

Goodbyes: 
Bok choi--these are really short lived in the spring and shine brightly in the fall when we grow a new round of them, sayonara for now.  
Rhubarb: our yearling plants have given us a good harvest for this year, and we will let them rest until next year when they will be more established.  

Check out the baby pawpaw fruits. North America's largest native fruit ripens in September and is sort of like vanilla-banana-avocado custard.  


Garlic Scape Pesto: 1 c. grated Parmesan cheese
3 T. fresh lemon or lime juice
1/4lb fresh garlic scapes
1/2 c. olive oil
Salt to taste

Puree scapes and olive oil in blender until smooth. Stir in Parmesan and lemon or lime juice and season to taste. Serve on bread or crackers. --courtesy of Mary Jane's Farm

 Enjoy the harvest!

Your farmers 

Friday, May 30, 2014

Getting ready for Harvest!


Good morning from the farm, 
Your farmers have been hard at work planting seeds in the greenhouse, transplanting seedlings into the field, tackling weeds, dodging rain and more in anticipation of the harvest.  
You may have noticed that it was a long cold winter and that spring has been on the cool rainy side as well. The crops are a bit slower because of it, so our harvests will begin a bit later.  We anticipate an abundant and typical harvest despite the slower start.  Summer has never failed us! 

Yes, we have 2014 Farm shares available still--sign up at:http://goodwillathomefieldsfarm.csasignup.com/members/types

Fruit share, Cheese share and bread--It's not to late to sign up for these shares, but do it soon. 
Fruit share: www.northstarorchard.comCheese share:  http://hillacrespride.com/?q=content/csa-sharesBread--not a share this season, but by the loaf from Abendessen Bread bakery instead

 
Let's plant some lettuce.  They are now in the ground and will soon be coming to a table near you. 


 The farm crew is all smiles preparing to plant tomatoes, peppers and eggplant

We're looking forward to great salad mix, lettuce heads, strawberries, tomatoes, blueberries, melons and more as we kick off this season.   

Your farmers